Month: October 2013

botox – advertising guidelines

Dr Singh who runs his botox clinic in Stevenage, Hertfordshire, in his latest blog shares the recent report by the Government regarding non surgical procedures such as botox.

Advertising Cosmetic Procedures (such as botox) and Products

Advertising in the UK is regulated by a system of co- regulation and self-regulation enforced by the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) through codes of practice. There is no specific code for non-surgical procedures. These procedures are currently regulated through codes covering medicines, medical devices, health-related products and beauty products. The Independent Healthcare Advisory Service (IHAS), the main trade body of the cosmetic sector, has also developed industry wide codes of practice. However, enforcing these policies remains a challenge, particularly in relation to online marketing.

The Keogh Review (see Box 5) has recommended that the ASA and industry take a more proactive stance in addressing bad practice, which includes:
 unrealistic claims about the benefits of cosmetic (botox) products

 advertising that trivialises risks associated with cosmetic procedures

 misleading claims about the qualifications of practitioners that perform botox treatments

 the targeting of people below the age of 18 for botox injections

 high pressure sales techniques.

 

Box 5. The Keogh Review: the Department of Health’s Independent Review of the Regulation of Cosmetic Interventions Primarily in response to the PIP breast implant scandal, the DH commissioned a review by Professor Sir Bruce Keogh of the regulation of cosmetic interventions. The PIP scandal involved breast implants which had unusually high rupture rates. The report identified ethical and regulatory challenges raised by the cosmetic sector, including:
 loopholes in European and national regulation of cosmetic products and devices

  the use of prescription products and other treatments by unlicensed professionals

  lack of professional oversight of those performing non-surgical cosmetic procedures

  absence of or inadequate screening of patients for psychological and health issues by some providers

  lack of legal redress for consumers when things go wrong

  misleading advertising and marketing practices. 

For more information about botox hertfordshire, please call us on 01438 300111.

BOTOX – patient information sheet

Dr Singh who runs his botox clinic in Stevenage, Hertfordshire, in his latest blog shows the patient information Leaflet he gives to patients when they enquire about botox injections.

Wrinkles and facial lines result from ageing, muscle activity (and over-activity) and your genetic predisposition. In addition, excessive sun exposure, alcohol consumption, emotional and hormonal influences and smoking can also increase the likelihood of wrinkles. Whilst you may be able to reduce or control some of the factors, you cannot influence all factors and that’s why we all develop some wrinkles as we age.

Aesthetics can offer professional consultations and treatments, such as botox to reduce the appearance of facial lines and wrinkles. Dr Singh has knowledge of head and neck anatomy and physiology together with training in the use of cosmetic treatments, which can subtly enhance your appearance to make you look younger.

If you are interested in talking about skin health treatments, please book a consultation appointment. Harry has had treatments and will be happy to talk with you or answer any questions.

What is botulinum toxin?

Botulinum is a substance that is produced by a bacteria; it is then highly refined, purified, diluted and used in therapeutic doses. Botulinum is administered by injecting it into a specific facial muscle where it acts as a muscle relaxant.

Who would benefit from this treatment?

Anyone can benefit from botox injections, both men and women. Botox® is most effective in improving lines or wrinkles due to facial expressions; for example, worry lines or frown lines on the forehead and between the eyebrows. This is because these lines are usually caused by overactive muscles and the treatment stops these muscles from contracting and causing the wrinkles.

You should not have treatment with botox if you are pregnant, breast-feeding, have a neuro- logical disease or a known hypersensitivity to it.

How long does the treatment take?

In most cases the treatment will take between 10 and 20 minutes. Effects will begin to appear very quickly within 48 hours to 72 hours, although the full extent of the treatment may not be visible for up to 10 days. Approximately two weeks after the first treatment, the effects will be reviewed with Dr Singh and any further treatments or top-ups can be discussed.

For more information about botox hertfordshire, please call us on 01438 300111.

botox – Government review

Dr Singh who runs his botox clinic in Stevenage, Hertfordshire, in his latest blog shares the points made by a recent Government paper released last  month.

 

This review of cosmetic procedures such as botox and dermal fillers were brought baout after the recent PIP scandal. The paper startred by giving an overview of the industry.

 

Overview

There is a growing UK market for surgical and non-surgical cosmetic treatments.

Around 90% of procedures are carried out on women.
Growth in the sector reflects increasing cultural acceptance of cosmetic procedures, particularly amongst young people.

There is a lack of reliable and comprehensive data on the range and number of procedures performed and medical complications resulting from non- surgical treatments.

Some cosmetic treatments are currently unregulated, despite the potential health risks to consumers.

Regulators are faced with several challenges, including the international nature of the market and enforcing regulations intended to protect the public from harm.

 

Then the paper discussed the recent Keogh report and its recomendations.

 The Keogh Review: the Department of Health’s Independent Review of the Regulation of Cosmetic Interventions Primarily in response to the PIP breast implant scandal, the DH commissioned a review by Professor Sir Bruce Keogh of the regulation of cosmetic interventions. The PIP scandal involved breast implants which had unusually high rupture rates. The report identified ethical and regulatory challenges raised by the cosmetic sector, including:
 loopholes in European and national regulation of cosmetic products and devices

 the use of prescription products and other treatments by unlicensed
professionals

 lack of professional oversight of those performing non-surgical
cosmetic procedures

 absence of or inadequate screening of patients for psychological
and health issues by some providers

 lack of legal redress for consumers when things go wrong

 misleading advertising and marketing practices.

 

For more information about botox hertfordshire, please call us on 01438 300111.